If you watched our videos from our homepage, you are most likely familiar with the basics of how the app STEMI works. However, you may be asking now how it differs from the common daily-used apps that allow sending pictures and making phone calls. Since STEMI has been created as a solution for the real problems of everyday clinical praxis in the field of invasive cardiology (you can read Our Story“ to learn more), our goal has always been to create an app with specific features designed to meet the specific needs of paramedics and other healthcare professionals involved in life-saving situations. We believe the following 5 reasons will answer this question for you:

 


 

1. “I didn't hear the phone ringing...” or “I didn't see your message” are far too common answers when it comes to today's mobile phone communication. To ensure it won't happen when a person's life is at stake, after sending a case by a paramedic, the smartphone in PCI or stroke center rings constantly for 40 seconds (max volume) with a 20-second break and it continues to do so until a doctor answers it. This is impossible to change or turn off as the order is intentionally rooted in the code.

 

2. The smartphone of the paramedic automatically receives sound notifications about the status of the case - when it is sent, received, and opened. This is to ensure that the paramedic pays attention to the patient instead of worrying and constantly checking if the consulting doctor received their message or not. Thus, the patient is attended to without unnecessary distraction.

 

3. To achieve the paramedic-specialist consultation as quickly as possible, the specialist can connect with the paramedic immediately by simply tapping the “CALL” button. This means that the time is not lost by looking up the right phone number in the contacts list or waiting to be connected through a call center. Moreover, the feature „Forward Event“ allows the doctor to resend the case to the “higher“, more specialized center and thus creates a direct internal communication triangle among the paramedic and both consultancy centers.

 

4. The app STEMI uses the smartphone's location services which enables the following:

- the paramedic can choose the nearest specialized center (PCI or stroke) and see whether the center is active (equipped and able to provide the patient with the necessary treatment) or not (e.g: CT broken, thrombolysis missing, other problem). This also means that cases when the patient has to be transported secondarily to another center because the one he arrived at is not able to provide the necessary procedure are eliminated.

- the doctor can see the estimated time of arrival (ETA) and so the medical team can be activated in advance and when the patient arrives the team is ready. This is a notable difference and a step forward when compared to the cases in the past when the patient arrived at the hospital, only then the STEMI or stroke diagnosis was confirmed and the patient had to wait until the invasive team got ready - and the precious time was lost.

- the app calculates the estimated time between recording of ECG and performing the PCI procedure. If the time exceeds the recommended time limit, the app notifies the paramedic so that he or she can consider giving the thrombolytic treatment while still in the EMS ambulance.

 


5. Reporting. All the individual cases flow through our database based on which we generate reports with many useful information for our clients. These include number and time of consultations, participants involved, estimated times of arrivals, speed of connection, clinical indicators present and evaluated by paramedics, etc. Our clients, EMS companies and hospitals, are able to utilize the information for evaluation and improvement of their activities from month to month.

 

The app STEMI is not “just another app” for sending pictures and making phone calls. STEMI represents a simple yet effective tool to improve EMS - hospital communication and consequently improve the stroke and STEMI treatment times. Because, after all, who says healthcare has to be complicated? :)

 



06.05.2018